Frequently Asked Questions

Welcome to our “Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)” section. Please scroll on the left categories where you will find many of the questions parents asks us. Of course, you are more than welcome to call our office and we will be glad to answer any questions you may have!!
First dental visit by age 1!

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry and American Academy of Pediatrics recommend the first dental visit should by age 1 or within 6 months after eruption of the 1st tooth.
Dentistry for children that are anxious and fearful, medically compromised, and/or special needs!

Dr. Chaudhry and Dr. Girardot are specialists in providing dental care for the medically and developmentally compromised and disabled patients. We can provide treatment in the office with nitrous oxide and/or IV sedation, or in the hospital under general anesthesia.
You are welcome to accompany your child in our treatment areas!

While most children do well for dental treatment without the presence of a parent, we feel that some children may need the added assurance of a parent accompanying them during their dental visit. For that reason, we allow parents in our treatment areas.

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GENERALPREVENTIONEARLY INFANT DENTAL CAREADOLESCENT DENTAL CARE

GENERAL TOPICS

  • What is a Pediatric Dentist?
    • Pediatric dentists are the pediatricians of dentistry. A pediatric dentist has two to three years specialty training following dental school and limits his/her practice to treating children only. Pediatric dentists are primary and specialty oral care providers for infants and children through adolescence, including those with special health needs. (www.aapd.org)
  • When should I take my child to the dentist for their first dental exam?
    • In order to prevent dental problems, your child should see a pediatric dentist when the first tooth appears, or no later than his/her first birthday. (www.aapd.org)
  • How often should my child see the dentist?
    • A check-up every six months is recommended in order prevent cavities and other dental problems. However, your pediatric dentist can tell you when and how often your child should visit based on their personal oral health. (www.aapd.org)
  • Why does my child grind at night? Is this a problem?
    • Children exhibit teeth grinding very commonly. Children’s bites are very flexible and subject to changes as they grow. Occasionally, children will exhibit an abnormal bite causing them to grind because of the placement of their teeth. Grinding can also be observed at times of stress/anxiety. A lot of children will stop grinding once their six-year permanent molars erupt. Their permanent teeth bite begins to establish itself once those molars erupt.   Grinding in children usually does not cause any damage. (aapd.org)
  • How do I prevent bad breath (halitosis) in my child?
    • There can be many causes for bad breath: Food, gum disease, dry mouth, smoking/tobacco, and medical conditions such as allergies, asthma, sinus/lung infections, diabetes, and/or gastrointestinal problems. Maintaining good oral hygiene, eliminating gum disease and scheduling regular professional cleanings are essential to reducing bad breath. Brush twice a day and clean between your teeth daily with floss. Brush your tongue, too.Mouthwashes can help too. We recommend to use an alcohol-free rinse for your child. If your child’s dental health is being addressed, we recommend you talk to their pediatrician to evaluate other causes. (www.mouthhealthy.org)
  • What can you do to help my child be comfortable during his/her dental visits?
    • Our goal is always to provide excellent dental care in the most enthusiastic and gentle manner so that you child always has a positive experience. Our staff has special training in helping children feel secure during dental treatment. We use different techniques in the office such as “Tell-Show-Do”, “Modeling”, and “Praise” techniques. We present dental treatment in different ways based on the age of the patient. For dental treatment we provide topical and local anesthetics, nitrous oxide, in-office IV sedation with an anesthesiologist (deep conscious sedation), or general anesthesia (Arnold Palmer Children’s Hospital or Florida Hospital). Our pediatric dentists will recommend the best way to attend to your child depending on their needs. (Orlando Pediatric Dentistry & Orthodontics)
  • What does nitrous oxide do and how safe is it?
    • Nitrous oxide is a safe and effective sedative agent that is mixed with oxygen and inhaled through a small mask that fits over your child’s nose to help him/her relax. Nitrous oxide, sometimes called “laughing gas,” is one option your child’s pediatric dentist may offer to help make your child more comfortable during certain procedures. It is not intended to put your child to sleep. Your child will be able to hear and respond to any requests or directions the pediatric dentist may have. Your child’s pediatric dentist will ask your child to breathe normally through his/her nose, and within a few short minutes your child should start to feel the effects of the nitrous oxide. Your child may feel light-headed or a tingling in his/her arms and legs. Some people say their arms and legs feel heavy. Ultimately, your child should feel calm and comfortable. The effects of nitrous oxide wear off soon after the mask is removed. (www.mouthhealthy.org)
  • How can I protect my child’s teeth during sporting events?
    • Mouthguards, also called mouth protectors, help cushion a blow to the face, minimizing the risk of broken teeth and injuries to your lips, tongue, face or jaw. They typically cover the upper teeth and are a great way to protect the soft tissues of your tongue, lips and cheek lining. There are different type of mouthguards available. Talk to your child’s dentist to see which type would fit your child the best. (www.mouthhealthy.org)
  • Whey are my child’s permanent teeth more yellow than their baby teeth?
    • Baby teeth have a slight different make up when compared to permanent teeth. Baby teeth have less dentin and thinner enamel, therefore, their teeth are more translucent giving the tooth a more “whiter” appearance. Permanent teeth have thicker enamel and more dentin, making permanent teeth appear more yellow than baby teeth. As your child continues to get more permanent teeth, the color of their smile will look more even. Permanent teeth can also look yellow due to poor hygiene and external and/or internal staining. Your child’s pediatric dentist can examine your child’s teeth, evaluate the color of their teeth, and make any recommendations if needed. (Orlando Pediatric Dentistry & Orthodontics)

PREVENTION

  • How can I prevent tooth decay on my child?
    • Parents should take their children to the dentist regularly, beginning with the eruption of the first tooth. Then, the dentist can recommend a specific program of brushing, flossing, and other treatments for parents to supervise and teach to their children. These home treatments, when added to regular dental visits and a balanced diet, will help give your child a lifetime of healthy habits.(www.aapd.org)
    • Make sure your child has a balanced diet, including one serving each of: fruits and vegetables, breads and cereals, milk and dairy products, and meat fish and eggs. Limiting the servings of sugars and starches will also aid in protecting your child’s teeth from decay. You can also ask your pediatric dentist to help you select foods that protect your children’s teeth. (www.aapd,org)
  • Can nursing cause decay? If so, how can I prevent it?
    • Nursing can cause decay. Avoid nursing children to sleep or putting anything other than water in their bed-time bottle. Also, learn the proper way to brush and floss your child’s teeth. Take your child to a pediatric dentist regularly to have his/her teeth and gums checked. The first dental visit should be scheduled by your child’s first birthday.(aapd.org)
  • When should I start cleaning my child’s teeth? Is it ok using toothpaste on my child and what kind should I use?
    • The sooner the better! Starting at birth, clean your child’s gums with a soft infant toothbrush or cloth and water. Parents should use a tiny smear of fluoride toothpaste to brush baby teeth twice daily as soon as they erupt and a soft, age-appropriate sized toothbrush. Once children are 3 to 6 years old, then the amount should be increased to a pea-size dollop and perform or assist your child’s tooth brushing. Remember that young children do not have the ability to brush their teeth effectively.  Children should spit out and not swallow excess toothpaste after brushing. If your child is unable to spit the toothpaste, wipe it off with a small towel or gauze. (aapd.org)
  • What is fluoride and how does it help my child?
    • Fluoride is a mineral that helps fight tooth decay. It is found in public water supplies, toothpaste and many other dental products.Fluoride helps repair the early stages of tooth decay even before the decay can be seen. Research shows that fluoride helps prevent cavities in children and adults by making teeth more resistant to the acid attacks that cause cavities. When you brush your child’s teeth with fluoride toothpaste, or use other fluoride dental products, you are preventing cavities and strengthening his/her teeth’s enamel. (www.mouthhealthy.org)
  • What are dental sealants?
    • Sealants work by filling in the crevasses on the chewing surfaces of the teeth. This shuts out food particles that could get caught in the teeth, causing cavities. The application is fast and comfortable and can effectively protect teeth for many years. (www.aapd.org)
  • Is chewing gum good for my child’s teeth?
    • Chewing sugarless gum for 20 minutes following meals can help prevent tooth decay. The chewing of sugarless gum increases the flow of saliva, which washes away food and other debris, neutralizes acids produced by bacteria in the mouth and provides disease-fighting substances throughout the mouth. Increased saliva flow also carries with it more calcium and phosphate to help strengthen tooth enamel. In the other hand, Chewing gum with sugar is bad for your child’s teeth.   Look for chewing gum with the ADA seal because you can be sure it’s sugarless. (mouthhealthy.org)
  • Are gummy vitamins, fruit snacks, fruit roll-ups or any other sticky snacks bad for my child’s teeth?
    • Gummy Vitamins, Fruit Snacks, Fruit Roll-ups and sticky snacks such as raisins and/or dried fruit are not healthy for your child’s teeth. They contain sugar and because of their texture, they stick to the teeth and remain in your child’s teeth for long periods of time. The daily intake of these items, coupled with the amount of sugar and stickiness, can cause cavities. A few options to replace these are items are as follows: For gummy vitamins, try to look for sugar-free gummy vitamins. If unable, try to replace them with children’s liquid vitamins or chewable vitamins. For Fruit Snacks and Fruit Roll ups, try to replace them with providing your child with actual fruits in their diet. (Orlando Pediatric Dentistry & Orthodontics)

 

EARLY INFANT DENTAL CARE

  • When should I take my child to the dentist for their first dental exam?
    • In order to prevent dental problems, your child should see a pediatric dentist when the first tooth appears, or no later than his/her first birthday. (aapd.org)
  • How often should my child see the dentist?
    • A check-up every six months is recommended in order prevent cavities and other dental problems. However, your pediatric dentist can tell you when and how often your child should visit based on their personal oral health. (www.aapd.org)
  • When should I start cleaning my child’s teeth? Is it ok using toothpaste on my child and what kind should I use?
    • The sooner the better! Starting at birth, clean your child’s gums with a soft infant toothbrush or cloth and water. Parents should use a tiny smear of fluoride toothpaste to brush baby teeth twice daily as soon as they erupt and a soft, age-appropriate sized toothbrush. Once children are 3 to 6 years old, then the amount should be increased to a pea-size dollop and perform or assist your child’s tooth brushing. Remember that young children do not have the ability to brush their teeth effectively.  Children should spit out and not swallow excess toothpaste after brushing. If your child is unable to spit the toothpaste, wipe it off with a small towel or gauze. (aapd.org)
  • Can nursing cause decay? If so, how can I prevent it?
    • Nursing can cause decay. Avoid nursing children to sleep or putting anything other than water in their bed-time bottle. Also, learn the proper way to brush and floss your child’s teeth. Take your child to a pediatric dentist regularly to have his/her teeth and gums checked. The first dental visit should be scheduled by your child’s first birthday.(aapd.org)
  • Are thumbsucking and pacifier habits bad for my child’s teeth?
    • Thumb and pacifier sucking habits will generally only become a problem if they go on for a very long period of time. Most children stop these habits on their own, but if they are still sucking their thumbs or fingers past the age of three, talk to your pediatric dentist to look at different options to address the habit. (aapd.org)

 

ADOLESCENT DENTAL CARE

  • Can my teenager use whitening products for his/her teeth?
    • Everybody loves a bright white smile, and there are a variety of products and procedures available to help your teenager improve the look of your teenager’s smile. Many people are satisfied with the sparkle they get from daily brushing and regular cleanings at your dentist’s office, but if your teenager decides they would like to go beyond this to make their smile look brighter, speak to your teenager’s pediatric dentist to learn about all whitening options. (www.mouthhealthy.org)
  • Are tobacco products harmful to teeth?
    • Smoking is bad in general, so it should be no surprise that all forms of tobacco are also harmful to your oral health. For one, they can cause bad breath, but that’s only the beginning. Other possible oral health impacts include: stained teeth and tongue, dulled sense of taste and smell, slow healing after a tooth extraction or oral surgery, difficulties in correcting cosmetic dental problems, gum disease, tooth loss, and/or oral cancer.
    • We strongly advise against the use of any tobacco products. (www.mouthhealthy.org)
  • Is grinding harmful to my teenager’s teeth
    • Teeth grinding (bruxism) can be caused not just by stress and anxiety but by sleep disorders, an abnormal bite or teeth that are missing or crooked. The symptoms of teeth grinding include: dull headaches, jaw soreness, teeth that are painful or loose, and/or fractured teeth. If you’re concerned about your teenager’s teeth grinding, ask your teenager’s pediatric dentist about the potential causes and, if necessary, the possible solutions. (www.mouthhealthy.org)